Rebus Still in Trouble – Even in Retirement

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It has been about five years since Ian Rankin retired DI John Rebus in Exit Music and seemingly left the troubling detective behind for man-of-the-rules Malcolm Fox.

But Rebus fans’ dreams came true when Rankin announced that Rebus would be making a comeback – with Siobhan Clarke and Fox beside him:

It is twenty-five years since Rebus first appeared in Knots and Crosses, and five years since he retired. In Standing in Another Man’s Grave not only is Rebus as stubborn and anarchic as ever, but he finds himself in trouble with Ian Rankin’s latest creation, Malcolm Fox of Edinburgh’s internal affairs unit. In the meantime his protégée Siobhan has stepped from under his shadow and is forging ahead in her own career.

Source: IanRankin.net

Talk about a dream mashup of characters.  Rebus the cop who loves to break rules and Fox the one who makes sure cops adhere to them, the combination of the two very different, but very similar, characters should be electrifying.  Of course, the question is – will this be a Rebus novel with Malcolm Fox as the guest star, or the other way around?

Do you have a favorite author you wish would take after Rankin’s lead?  If you’re a Rankin fan, are you excited about Rebus’s return or just wish he would have left the character out of Edinburgh CID?

 

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2 thoughts on “Rebus Still in Trouble – Even in Retirement

    daniel ramey USA Texas said:
    August 5, 2012 at 7:51 PM

    best detective team in years…can’t stop watching this on netflix 1..2..3..

    […] When Standing in Another Man’s Grave was announced, I was excited about the prospect of Fox and Rebus going toe to toe.  There are plenty of our favorite authors who have multiple beloved characters, and wouldn’t we all like to watch these characters meet?  By the earlier released log line, I assumed this was a book from Fox, and that Rebus would be a minor figure.  Paint me astonished, because upon reading it the book was much the other way around.  The majority of the narrative follows Rebus on the case, and we only get a small glimpse into what Fox thinks of this rather old-fashioned cop.  And that glimpse is rather scathing. […]

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